Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/14472
Title: Costs of disinvesting from stop smoking services: an economic evaluation based on the NICE Tobacco Return on Investment model
Authors: Pokhrel, S
Owen, L
Coyle, K
Lester-George, A
Leng, G
West, R
Coyle, D
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: The Lancet, 388: pp. S95 - S95, (2016)
Abstract: Background WHO’s MPOWER model highlights the importance of supporting smoking cessation. Stop smoking services in England have played a key part in achieving smoking cessation. These services provide an evidence-based combination of behavioural support and medication and have been rigorously monitored since their inception. Owing to the fi nancial pressures on local authorities in England, funding cuts are aff ecting many stop smoking services. The aim of this study was to assess the potential impact of disinvesting in these services. Methods The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Tobacco Return on Investment tool, a Markov-based state transition model, was used to estimate the number of additional quitters that the stop smoking services produced compared with no such services. We used data of current use of services from April 1, 2013, to March 31, 2014. We estimated this benefi t in terms of the impact on costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) using a lifetime horizon and 3·5% discount rate and taking a quasi-societal (health care and productivity) perspective. Findings Of the 8 456 877 smokers in England in 2013–14, 583 525 (6·9%) used stop smoking services. These services led to an additional 89 852 quitters that year (11 per 1000 smokers) at a cost of £109 million. This investment will result in a gain of 6·8 QALYs per 1000 smokers (57 619 QALYs across England). For every £1 invested, £2·37 will be saved on treating smoking-related diseases and reduced productivity, and £12.87 will be saved overall if QALY gains are valued at £20 000 per QALY.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/14472
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32331-5
ISSN: 0140-6736
Appears in Collections:Health Economics Research Group (HERG)

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