Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16083
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dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, K-
dc.contributor.authorEllis-Hill, C-
dc.contributor.authorStaal, J-
dc.contributor.authorBucks, R-
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-06T14:24:48Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-01-
dc.date.available2018-04-06T14:24:48Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias, 2010, 25 (8), pp. 698 - 703en_US
dc.identifier.issn1533-3175-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16083-
dc.description.abstractDementia is a growing problem worldwide and interventions to effectively manage and promote function are urgently required. Multisensory environments (MSEs) have been used extensively with people with dementia; however, no studies have been conducted to explore the efficacy of sensory stimulation on functional performance. This study explores to what extent multisensory stimulation influences functional performance in people with moderate-to-severe dementia using an MSE compared with a control activity. Thirty participants with moderate-to-severe dementia were recruited from the South of England. Following baseline assessment and design of a bespoke intervention, each participant attended their allocated intervention (3 x week, for 4 weeks). Assessments were carried out pre and postsession using the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. Results indicate significant improvement in functional performance in both the MSE and the control activity. Findings support the use of MSEs as a strategy for enhancing functional performance in dementia. © The Author(s) 2010.en_US
dc.format.extent698 - 703-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMultisensory stimulation to improve functional performance in moderate to severe dementia-interim resultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1533317510387582-
dc.relation.isPartOfAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias-
pubs.issue8-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.volume25-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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