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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/829

Title: COMPRENDO: Focus and approach
Authors: Schulte-Oehlmann, U
Albanis, T
Allera, A
Bachmann, J
Berntsson, P
Beresford, NA
Carnevali, DC
Ciceri, F
Dagnac, T
Falandysz, J
Galassi, S
Hala, D
Janer, G
Jeannot, R
Jobling, S
King, I
Klingmüller, D
Kloas, W
Kusk, KO
Levada, R
Lo, S
Lutz, I
Oehlmann, J
Oredsson, S
Porte, C
Rand-Weaver, M
Sakkas, M
Sakkas, V
Sugni, M
Tyler, C
van Aerle, R
van Ballegoy, C
Wollenberger, L
Keywords: Androgens
Antiandrogens
Endocrine disruptor
Environmental health
Molecular screening
Phylogenetic approach
Wildlife exposure
Publication Date: 2006
Publisher: National Institute of Environmental Health Science
Citation: Environmental Health Perspectives 2006 Apr; 114(S-1): 98-100, Mar 2006
Abstract: Tens of thousands of man-made chemicals are in regular use and discharged into the environment. Many of them are known to interfere with the hormonal systems in humans and wildlife. Given the complexity of endocrine systems, there are many ways in which endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect the body’s signaling system, and this makes unraveling the mechanisms of action of these chemicals difficult. A major concern is that some of these EDCs appear to be biologically active at extremely low concentrations. There is growing evidence to indicate that the guiding principle of traditional toxicology that “the dose makes the poison” may not always be the case because some EDCs do not induce the classical dose–response relationships. The European Union project COMPRENDO (Comparative Research on Endocrine Disrupters—Phylogenetic Approach and Common Principles focussing on Androgenic/Antiandrogenic Compounds) therefore aims to develop an understanding of potential health problems posed by androgenic and antiandrogenic compounds (AACs) to wildlife and humans by focusing on the commonalities and differences in responses to AACs across the animal kingdom (from invertebrates to vertebrates).
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/829
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.8060
Appears in Collections:Institute for the Environment Research Papers
Environment
Biological Sciences

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