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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/1314

Title: Self-Reported Upper Body Discomfort due to Driving: Effect of Driving Experience, Gender and Automobile Age
Authors: Giacomin, J
Keywords: discomfort
driving, experience, automobile, gender, Borg
Publication Date: 2005
Citation: Zeitschrift fur Arbeitswissenschaft, 5, pp409-418
Abstract: This study investigated the human upper body discomfort caused by automobile driving. Both global and local discomfort estimates were achieved by means of a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire used a Borg CR10 scale to evaluate human discomfort, and contained sections to gather information regarding the driving experience, gender and most frequently used automobile of the respondent. The geographic area surveyed was the city of Turin, Italy, and data from a total of 269 drivers was analysed. For all subgroups analysed, the back region was reported to suffer the greatest discomfort, followed in order of decreasing discomfort by the neck, shoulder, arm, hand-wrist, forearm, head, chest and mandible. Generally, female drivers provided higher discomfort responses than male drivers. Subdividing the data according to driving experience lead to large and statistically significant (a<0.05) differences inboth global and local discomfort. Subdividing by gender suggested some significant differences, while subdividing by automobile age produced few differences. The results suggest the usefulness of controlling for test subject driving experience and gender when performing subjective evaluations of automobiles. Further, comparison of the global and the local discomfort responses suggested that individuals were able to form a stable estimate of global discomfort based on the sensations perceived in each of the individual body regions involved. This suggests the interesting possibility that global evaluations may not always provide an accurate understanding of human discomfort since situations can be imagined in which different distributions of upper body discomfort might produce the same, global, response.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/1314
Appears in Collections:Design
Dept of Design Research Papers

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