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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/1440

Title: In-vehicle vibration study of child safety seats
Authors: Giacomin, J
Gallo, S
Keywords: Children
Child seat
Vibration
Vehicle
Comfort
Publication Date: 2003
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Ergonomics. 46 (15): 1500-1512
Abstract: This paper reports experimental measurements of the in-vehicle vibrational behaviour of stage 0&1 child safety seats. Road tests were performed for eight combinations of child, child seat and automobile. Four accelerometers were installed in the vehicles and orientated to measure as closely as possible in the vertical direction; two were attached to the floor and two located at the human interfaces. An SAE pad was placed under the ischial tuberosities of the driver at the seat cushion and a child pad, designed for the purpose of this study, was placed under the child. 4 test runs were made over a pave’ (cobblestone) surface for the driver’s seat and 4 for the child seat at both 20 km/h and 40 km/h. Power spectral densities were determined for all measurement points and acceleration transmissibility functions (ATFs) were estimated from the floor of the vehicle to the human interfaces. The system composed of automobile seat, child seat and child was found to transmit greater vibration than the system composed of automobile seat and driver. The ensemble mean transmissibility in the frequency range from 1 to 60 Hz was found to be 77% for the child seat systems as opposed to 61% for the driver’s seats. The acceleration transmissibility for the child seat system was found to be higher than that of the driver’s seat at most frequencies above 10 Hz for all eight systems tested. The measured ATFs suggest that the principal whole-body vibration resonance of the children occurred at a mean frequency of 8.5, rather than the 3.5 to 5.0 Hz typically found in the case of seated adults. It can be concluded that current belt-fastened child seats are less effective than the vehicle primary seating systems in attenuating vibrational disturbances. The results also suggest the potential inability of evaluating child comfort by means of existing whole-body vibration standards.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/1440
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0014013032000121642
Appears in Collections:Design
Dept of Design Research Papers

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