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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/2192

Title: The effectiveness of origami on overall hand function after injury: A pilot controlled trial
Authors: Wilson, L
Roden, P
Taylor, Y
Marston, L
Keywords: Hand therapy
Function
Origami
Publication Date: 2008
Publisher: British Association of Hand Therapists
Citation: British Journal of Hand Therapy. 13 ( 1) 12-20
Abstract: This pilot study measured the effectiveness of using origami to improve the overall hand function of outpatients attending an NHS hand injury unit. The initiative came from one of the authors who had used origami informally in the clinical setting and observed beneficial effects. These observed effects were tested experimentally. The design was a pilot non-randomised controlled trial with 13 participants. Allocation of the seven control group members was based on patient preference. The experimental group members attended a weekly hour of origami for six weeks, in addition to their conventional rehabilitation. Hand function of all participants was measured using the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test before and after the six-week period, and additional qualitative data were gathered in the form of written evaluations from patients. The quantitative data were analysed using the Mann Whitney U test or Fisher’s exact test. Themes were highlighted from the qualitative data. The results show that there was a greater difference in the total score of the experimental group using the impaired hand between pre- and post-intervention of 11.8 seconds, compared with 4.3 seconds in the control group, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level (p=0.06). Additionally, differences in the sub-test scores show a markedly larger improvement in the experimental group. Qualitative data indicate that the experimental group experienced the origami sessions as being enjoyable and beneficial. Further research with a larger sample and randomised group allocation is recommended to verify and expand these preliminary findings.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/2192
Appears in Collections:School of Health Sciences and Social Care Research Papers
Community Health and Public Health

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