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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/2859

Title: Women and children first? Child abuse and child protection in sport
Authors: Brackenridge, CH
Keywords: sport, human rights,
wopmen, child protection
Publication Date: 2006
Publisher: Routledge
Citation: In: R. Giulianotti and D. McArdle (eds). Sport, civil liberties and human rights. London: Routledge, 2006. pp. 30-45.
Abstract: Child welfare and women's rights both feature prominently in contemporary debates on equal rights. Whereas gender equity has been a policy objective for the past thirty years in sport organizations, however, child abuse and protection have only recently emerged as a sport ethics issues. Arguably, child protection has now leapfrogged over gender equity as a policy priority. The chapter opens with a discussion of the role of children in sport in relation to opposing ideologies of social control and personal freedom, and outlines the development of child protection and gender equity initiatives in sport, including the establishment of the not-for-profit Women’s Sports Foundation (UK) and the first national women in sport policy in England, and of a dedicated Sport England/NSPCC Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU). The shift in theoretical focus from ‘women’ to ‘gender’ has been accompanied by a widening of the general social policy attention away from solely heterosexual interests. Sport organisations have responded comparatively slowly to the new rights agenda for gay men, lesbians, bisexual and transgendered people but it is argued here that the arrival of the CPSU not only gave huge impetus to the institutionalisation of child protection in sport but also forced sports bodies to address ethics and equity agendas more forcibly than they had done before. In this way, the issue of child protection has acted as a kind of ethical Trojan horse in sport. The paradox of child protection in sport, however, is that it has simultaneously drawn public attention to issues of abuse and exploitation and deflected attention away from the specific issue of women’s rights in sport.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/2859
ISBN: 0-714-65344-6
Appears in Collections:Sport
Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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