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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/4125

Title: Natural and anthropogenic forest fires recorded in the Holocene pollen record from a Jinchuan peat bog, northeastern China
Authors: Jiang, W
Leroy, SAG
Ogle, N
Chu, G
Wang, L
Liu, J
Keywords: Pollen record
Fire
Vegetation
Human activity
Holocene
Northeastern China
Publication Date: 2008
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology: 261(1-2): 47–57
Abstract: Pollen and charcoal particles from a Jinchuan peat (northeastern China) were examined to investigate the fire origin and interaction between climate, vegetation, fire and human activity during the Holocene. Pollen results show that: (i) a broadleaved deciduous forest was dominant during the early Holocene; (ii) from ~5500 cal. yr B.P. there was a gradual increase in coniferous trees (mainly Pinus), and a decrease in broadleaved deciduous trees (e.g. Quercus, Juglans, and Ulmus–Zelkova); (iii) after ~4200 cal. yr B.P., the deciduous forest was replaced by a mixed forest of coniferous and deciduous trees; (iv) coniferous trees including Pinus, Abies and Picea further increased after ~2000 cal. yr B.P., reflecting a cooler and drier climate after ~5500–4200 cal. yr B.P. Two layers of abundant microfossil charcoal particles (250–10 μm) and the coexistence of macrofossil particles (N2 mm) suggest two local fires: fire event 1 (5120±66 cal. yr B.P.) and fire event 2 (1288±8 cal. yr B.P., AD 662±8). Charcoal layer 1, with a large amount of Monolete psilate spores, is superimposed on the long-term trend of vegetation changes, indicating a natural origin for fire event 1 that was probably facilitated by drying environmental conditions since the mid-Holocene. Cerealia-type pollen and a low percentage of Monolete psilate spores were observed in charcoal layer 2, indicating that fire event 2 was caused by clearing. We suggest that fire event 2 may be related to the spread of the Han farming culture accompanied by the territorial expansion of the Tang Dynasty to the studied area in AD 668.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/4125
ISSN: 0031-0182
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Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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