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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/5026

Title: Does it fit okay? Problems with condom use as a function of self-reported poor fit
Authors: Crosby, RA
Yarber, WL
Graham, CA
Sanders, SA
Publication Date: 2010
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: Sexually Transmitted Infections 86(1): 36-38, Feb 2010
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To identify associations between men's self-reports of ill-fitting condoms and selected condom use problems, using an event-specific analysis. METHODS: A convenience sample of men was recruited via advertisements in newspapers (two urban and one small town) and a blog on the website of a condom sales company. Men completed a questionnaire posted on the website of The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. Inclusion criteria were: at least 18 years old, used condoms for penile–vaginal intercourse in the past 3 months and the ability to read English. RESULTS: In controlled, event-specific, analyses of 436 men, those reporting ill-fitting condoms (44.7%) were significantly more likely to report breakage (adjusted odds ratio (AOR 2.6), slippage (AOR 2.7), difficulty reaching orgasm, both for their female partners (AOR 1.9) and for themselves (AOR 2.3). In addition, they were more likely to report irritation of the penis (AOR 5.0) and reduced sexual pleasure, both for their female partner (AOR 1.6) and for themselves (AOR 2.4). Furthermore, they were more likely to report that condoms interfered with erection (AOR 2.0), caused erection loss (AOR 2.3), or became dry during sex (AOR 1.9). Finally, they were more likely to report removing condoms before penile–vaginal sex ended (AOR 2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Men and their female sex partners may benefit from public health efforts designed to promote the improved fit of condoms.
Description: This is an open access article - Copyright © 2010 by the BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. All rights reserved
Sponsorship: Support for this project was provided, in part, by the Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention, a joint project of Indiana University, University of Colorado, and the University of Kentucky and by The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, Indiana University.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/5026
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/sti.2009.036665
ISSN: 1472-3263
Appears in Collections:School of Social Sciences Research Papers
Psychology

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