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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/6562

Title: Investigation into intrinsic motivation and reputational concerns in the public sector
Authors: Tabvuma, Vurain
Advisors: Iossa, E
Georgellis, Y
Keywords: Public service motivation
Adaptation
Publication Date: 2010
Publisher: School of Social Sciences Theses
Abstract: The objective of this thesis is to provide both empirical evidence and theoretical explanations that will show the positive and negative effects of intrinsic motivation and reputational concerns in the public sector. The thesis argues that by having intrinsically motivated individuals in the public sector (i.e. individuals that are public service motivated), the government can provide higher quality public goods and services at a lower cost. The thesis finds empirical evidence for the existence of public service motivation and also finds that high extrinsic rewards in the public sector deter individuals with high levels of public service motivation from joining the public sector. There is also empirical evidence showing that individuals remain public service motivated in the long term. This thesis also investigates whether the reputational concerns of a principal (government) can lead to under provision of quality improving effort by contracted firms in procurement contracts. The thesis finds that reputational concerns cause the decision maker to intervene in procurement projects more frequently than is optimal. This then results in the contracted private firm exerting less effort to produce quality improving firm specific investments. Since public service motivation can improve the delivery of public goods and services, these findings lead us to conclude that governments must find ways to recruit a larger proportion of public service motivated individuals into the public sector. These findings also highlight the importance of reputational concerns in the decision making process of governments. They show us that reputational concerns can have very negative effects on procurement contracts.
Description: This thesis was submitted for the degree of Docter of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University on 22nd December 2009.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/6562
Appears in Collections:School of Social Sciences Theses
Economics and Finance

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