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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/6579

Title: The role of the user within the medical device design and development process: Medical device manufacturers' perspectives
Authors: Money, AG
Barnett, J
Kuljis, J
Craven, MP
Martin, JL
Young, T
Keywords: Medical device design and development process
Medical device manufacturers
Standards
Human factors engineering methods
Publication Date: 2011
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 11:15, Feb 2011
Abstract: Background: Academic literature and international standards bodies suggest that user involvement, via the incorporation of human factors engineering methods within the medical device design and development (MDDD) process, offer many benefits that enable the development of safer and more usable medical devices that are better suited to users' needs. However, little research has been carried out to explore medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within this process, or indeed what value they believe can be added by doing so.Methods: In-depth interviews with representatives from 11 medical device manufacturers are carried out. We ask them to specify who they believe the intended users of the device to be, who they consult to inform the MDDD process, what role they believe the user plays within this process, and what value (if any) they believe users add. Thematic analysis is used to analyse the fully transcribed interview data, to gain insight into medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within the MDDD process.Results: A number of high-level themes emerged, relating who the user is perceived to be, the methods used, the perceived value and barriers to user involvement, and the nature of user contributions. The findings reveal that despite standards agencies and academic literature offering strong support for the employment formal methods, manufacturers are still hesitant due to a range of factors including: perceived barriers to obtaining ethical approval; the speed at which such activity may be carried out; the belief that there is no need given the 'all-knowing' nature of senior health care staff and clinical champions; a belief that effective results are achievable by consulting a minimal number of champions. Furthermore, less senior health care practitioners and patients were rarely seen as being able to provide valuable input into the process.Conclusions: Medical device manufacturers often do not see the benefit of employing formal human factors engineering methods within the MDDD process. Research is required to better understand the day-to-day requirements of manufacturers within this sector. The development of new or adapted methods may be required if user involvement is to be fully realised.
Description: Copyright @ 2011 Money et al.
Sponsorship: This study was in part funded by grant number Ref: GR/S29874/01 from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. This article is made available through the Brunel University Open Access Publishing Fund.
URI: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/11/15
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/6579
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6947-11-15
ISSN: 1472-6947
Appears in Collections:Information Systems and Computing
School of Information Systems, Computing and Mathematics Research Papers
Publications
Brunel OA Publishing Fund

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