Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16207
Title: Vortex shedding-induced noise reduction using (DBD) plasma actuator
Other Titles: Vortex shedding-induced noise reduction
Authors: AL-Sadawi, Laith Ayad
Advisors: Chong, T P
Wissink, J
Keywords: DBD plasma actuator;Plasma;Vortex shredding;Flow control;Noise reduction
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Brunel University London
Abstract: The Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators have received a significant attention of many researchers in the last few decades. The main focus of these studies has been on the flow control areas such as turbulent boundary layer separation and turbulent skin friction reduction. Little attention has been paid on the effect of the DBD plasma actuators on the aerodynamic noise reduction. In this regard, the aim of the current work is to investigate the effect of the DBD plasma actuator driven at relatively low voltages on vortex-induced noise. The first part of the current work includes an extensive assessment of the effect of the DBD plasma actuator on the narrowband tonal noise radiated from a flat plate with blunt trailing edge and an airfoil (NACA 0012) with blunt and cut-in type serrated trailing edge. The measurements were carried out at Reynolds numbers between 0.75 x 10 to the power of 5 and 4 x 10 to the power of 5. It is found that the DBD plasma actuator effectiveness depends on the direction of the generated electric wind. For example, a high reduction in the narrowband tonal noise level is achieved when a direct streamwise electric wind is injected into the wake region. However, using a plasma actuator, which can induce streamwise vortices into the wake region, shows more superior noise reduction capability at lower voltages. Flow measurement results revealed that the mechanism responsible for the narrowband tonal noise reduction when the electric wind is directly injected into the wake is not due the momentum injection into the wake deficit. Rather, the streamwise jet isolates the two separated shear layers and prevents the interaction between them. On the other hand, it is found that the break-up of the spanwise coherence of the vortex shedding is responsible for the significant reduction in the tonal noise level when the spanwise actuation is used. The second part of the current work comprises the effect of the DBD plasma actuator on both the narrowband tonal noise and interaction broadband noise radiated from both single and tandem cylinder, respectively. The experiments were conducted at subcritical Reynolds number ReD = 1.1 x 10 to the power of 4. The actuators were positioned at different azimuthal angles 27° ≤ θj ≤ 153°. For the single cylinder case, the acoustic results show the DBD plasma actuator that is positioned at θj = 133° leads to a more reduction in the narrowband tonal noise level when compared to the other angles. It is found that the streamwise jet produced by the plasma actuators plays an important role in prevention of the interaction between the shear layers that separates from the cylinder. For the tandem cylinders case, the acoustic results show that the simultaneous actuation of both the upstream and the downstream cylinders leads to more reduction in both the narrowband tonal noise and the interaction broadband noise level compared with the case where only the upstream or the downstream cylinder is actuated. The mechanism responsible for this noise reduction is found to be mainly due to the streamwise jet induced by the upstream cylinder activation, which delays the vortex shedding formation and reduces the turbulence intensity in the near wake region. On the other hand, the plasma induced jet against the main-flow direction works as a virtual fluidic barrier which displaces the wake produced by the upstream cylinder away from the downstream cylinder.
Description: This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16207
Appears in Collections:Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Dept of Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering Theses

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