Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/800
Title: Building health research systems to achieve better health
Authors: Hanney, S
Gonzalez-Block, MA
Keywords: Health research systems;;research utilization;;research impacts;;research organization;;agenda-setting
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Citation: Stephen R Hanney, Miguel A Gonz├ílez Block, Building health research systems to achieve better health. Health Research Policy and Systems 2006, 4:10
Abstract: Health research systems can link knowledge generation with practical concerns to improve health and health equity. Interest in health research, and in how health research systems should best be organised, is moving up the agenda of bodies such as the World Health Organisation. Pioneering health research systems, for example those in Canada and the UK, show that progress is possible. However, radical steps are required to achieve this. Such steps should be based on evidence not anecdotes. Health Research Policy and Systems (HARPS) provides a vehicle for the publication of research, and informed opinion, on a range of topics related to the organisation of health research systems and the enormous benefits that can be achieved. Following the Mexico ministerial summit on health research, WHO has been identifying ways in which it could itself improve the use of research evidence. The results from this activity are soon to be published as a series of articles in HARPS. This editorial provides an account of some of these recent key developments in health research systems but places them in the context of a distinguished tradition of debate about the role of science in society. It also identifies some of the main issues on which 'research on health research' has already been conducted and published, in some cases in HARPS. Finding and retaining adequate financial and human resources to conduct health research is a major problem, especially in low and middle income countries where the need is often greatest. Research ethics and agenda-setting that responds to the demands of the public are issues of growing concern. Innovative and collaborative ways are being found to organise the conduct and utilisation of research so as to inform policy, and improve health and health equity. This is crucial, not least to achieve the health-related Millennium Development Goals. But much more progress is needed. The editorial ends by listing a wide range of topics related to the above priorities on which we hope to feature further articles in HARPS and thus contribute to an informed debate on how best to achieve such progress.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/800
ISSN: 1478-4505
Appears in Collections:Health Economics Research Group (HERG)

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