Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15333
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dc.contributor.authorZaccaria, EC-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-31T13:27:42Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-07-
dc.date.available2017-10-31T13:27:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Corporate Law Studies, 2017, pp. 1 - 30en_US
dc.identifier.issn1473-5970-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15333-
dc.description.abstractFollowing the implementation in the United Kingdom of the Directive on financial collateral arrangements 2002/47/EC, it is extremely difficult - if not simply impossible - to confine certain concepts of law (mainly those of possession and control) within sharp and definitive boundaries. Nowadays, the main perception is that there can be different forms of control as well as different forms of possession (depending on the type of asset involved and/or the terms and conditions posed by the parties to the security agreement). The article suggests that this ‘flexibility’ is by no means surprising as it reflects the tradition, ingrained in English law to continuously stretch the notion of property to accommodate market needs.-
dc.format.extent1 - 30-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectPossessionen_US
dc.titleAn Inquiry into the meaning of possession and control over financial assets and the effects on third partiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Corporate Law Studies-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Politics, History and Law Embargoed Research Papers

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