Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/17018
Title: Photon Manipulation of Electron Transportation in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Algae Using Semiconductor Lasers
Authors: Al-Yasiri, Sadiq Jafar Khayoun
Advisors: Balachandran, W
Darwish, M
Keywords: Renewable energy;Semiconductor lasers;Algae;Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii;Photosystem I and II
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Brunel University London
Abstract: The aim of this research was to increase the rate of cell division in algae by exploring the effect of combinations of lasers of various wavelengths. Literature search has identified a gap in knowledge of the potential for increase in efficiency of the electron transition between photosystem II and photosystem I. This through the use of several wavelengths of blue and or red lasers, including 405 nm, 450, and 473 nm, 635 nm, 650 nm, 680 nm, 685 nm and 700 nm to generate photons with energies more closely matching the absorption spectra of algae receptors known as pigments. This investigation underpins the realisation that photons emanating from a specific laser are absorbed by algae pigments because there is a much closer match between the emission spectrum of the laser and the absorption spectrum of the pigments within the photosystems of algae. This research examined all of the available laser wavelengths in particular combinations; the resultant data contributed to the assembly of a matrix that illustrates the most appropriate laser combinations that promote cell division within algae. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae cells successfully grew and divided under exposure to both the blue laser, red laser and that of white light LED when each was applied individually or combined in a sequence. The order of the sequence of using the red and blue lasers in specific cases was important. The pH was maintained between 6.9 and 7.7, with temperatures maintained between 19.00 and 25.00 ºC. For the blue lasers, the laboratory results were as follows, (irradiation time was 12 hours every time):  405 nm blue laser produced 1.8 x cell division of the white light LED.  For 450 nm blue laser: the white light LED produced 1.5 x cell division of the blue laser 450 nm.  473 nm blue laser produced 2 x cell division of the white light LED.  405 nm blue laser produced 3.6 x cell division of natural day light.  450 nm blue laser produced 1.4 x cell division of natural day light.  473 nm blue laser produced 4 x cell division of natural day light.For the red lasers, the laboratory results were as follows, (irradiation time was 12 hours every time):  For 635 nm red laser: the white light LED produced 4 x cell division of the red laser 635 nm.  650 nm red laser produced 1.96 x cell division of the white light LED.  680 nm red laser produced 2.3 x cell division of the white light LED.  For 685 nm red laser: white light LED produced 1.22 x cell division of the red laser 685 nm.  700 nm red laser produced 1.35 x cell division of the white light LED.  For 635 nm red laser: the natural day light produced 2 x cell division of the red laser 635 nm.  650 nm red laser produced 3.9 x cell division of natural day light.  680 nm red laser produced 4.6 x cell division of natural day light.  685 nm red laser produced 1.6 x cell division of natural day light.  700 nm red laser produced 2.7 x cell division of natural day light. For the combination of blue and red lasers, the laboratory results were as follows, (irradiation time was 12 hours every time):  First combination: 405 nm blue laser followed by a combination of 680 nm and 700 nm red lasers produced 4.86 x cell division of the white light LED.  Second combination: 473 nm blue laser followed by a combination of 680 nm and 700 nm red lasers produced 4.66 x cell division of the white light LED.  Third combination: a combination of 680 nm and 700 nm red lasers produced 4.43 x cell division of the white light LED.
Description: This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/17018
Appears in Collections:Electronic and Computer Engineering
Dept of Electronic and Computer Engineering Theses

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