Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7991
Title: Contemporary splinting practice in the UK for adults with neurological dysfunction: A cross-sectional survey
Authors: Hoffman, K
Baird, T
Tuckey, J
Marston, L
De Souza, L
Keywords: Splinting;Neurology;Physiotherapy;Occupational therapy;Contracture;Guidelines
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Mark Allen Healthcare
Citation: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 20(11), 559-566, 2013.
Abstract: Aim: To explore the contemporary splinting practice of UK occupational therapists and physiotherapists for adults with neurological dysfunction. Method: Cross-sectional online survey of members of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Neurology and College of Occupational Therapists Specialist Section Neurological Practice. Results: Four hundred and twenty therapists completed the survey. Contracture management is the most common rationale for therapists splinting adults with neurological dysfunction. Other shared therapeutic goals of splinting include maintaining muscle and joint alignment, spasticity management, function, pain management and control of oedema. Considerable clinical uncertainty was uncovered in practice particularly around wearing regimens of splints. Most therapists have access to locally-derived splinting guidelines, which may contribute to this diversity of practice. Conclusions: This study provides a unique insight into aspects of contemporary splinting practice among UK therapists, who belong to a specialist neurological professional network and work in a number of different health-care settings with adults who have a neurological condition. Study findings show a wide variation in splinting practice, thereby indicating a potential need for national guidance to assist therapists in this area of clinical uncertainty. Further research is required to establish best practice parameters for splinting in neurological rehabilitation.
Description: This article is made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund.
URI: http://www.ijtr.co.uk/cgi-bin/go.pl/library/abstract.html?uid=101680
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7991
ISSN: 1741-1645
Appears in Collections:Community Health and Public Health
Physiotherapy
Brunel OA Publishing Fund
Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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