Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8298
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dc.contributor.authorDe Souza, LH-
dc.contributor.authorFrank, JL-
dc.contributor.authorNeophytou, C-
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-14T10:07:59Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-14T10:07:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationDisability and Rehabilitation, 34(9), 770 - 778, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn0963-8288-
dc.identifier.urihttp://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2011.619620en
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8298-
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2012 Informa UK, Ltd. This is the author's accepted manuscript. The final published article is available from the link below.en_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore the experience of pain and discomfort in users of electric-powered indoor/outdoor wheelchairs (EPIOCs) provided by a National Health Service. Methods: EPIOC users receiving their chair between February and November 2002 (N=74) were invited to participate in a telephone questionnaire/interview and 64 (aged 1081 years) agreed. Both specific and open-ended questions examined the presence of pain/discomfort, its severity, minimizing and aggravating factors, particularly in relation to the EPIOC and its use. Results: Most EPIOC users described experiences of pain with 17% reporting severe pain. Over half felt their pain was influenced by the wheelchair and few (25%) considered their chair eased their symptoms. The most common strategy for pain relief was taking medication. Other self-help strategies included changing position, exercise and complementary therapies. Respondents emphasized the provision of backrests, armrests, footrests and cushions which might alleviate or exacerbate pain, highlighting the importance of appropriate assessment for this high dependency group. Conclusions: Users related pain to their underlying medical condition, their wheelchair or a combination of the two. User feedback is essential to ensure that the EPIOC meets health needs with minimal pain. This becomes more important as the health condition of users changes over time.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen_US
dc.subjectAssistive technologyen_US
dc.subjectPainen_US
dc.subjectPowered wheelchairsen_US
dc.subjectUsers’ experiencesen_US
dc.subjectWheelchair usersen_US
dc.titleThe pain experiences of powered wheelchair usersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2011.619620-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Health Sciences & Social Care-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Health Sciences & Social Care/Physiotherapy-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups/School of Health Sciences and Social Care - URCs and Groups-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups/School of Health Sciences and Social Care - URCs and Groups/Brunel Institute for Ageing Studies-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups/School of Health Sciences and Social Care - URCs and Groups/Centre for Research in Rehabilitation-
Appears in Collections:Community Health and Public Health
Physiotherapy
Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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