Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12955
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dc.contributor.authorMendick, H-
dc.contributor.authorAllen, K-
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, L-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T11:18:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-01-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T11:18:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Educational Studies, 63 (2): pp. 161 - 178, (2015)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1467-8527-
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00071005.2014.1002382-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12955-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on 24 group interviews on celebrity with 148 students aged 14–17 across six schools, we show that ‘hard work’ is valued by young people in England. We argue that we should not simply celebrate this investment in hard work. While it opens up successful subjectivities to previously excluded groups, it reproduces neoliberal meritocratic discourses and class and gender distinctions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the ESRC under Grant ES/J022942/1. We are grateful to them for funding this study.en_US
dc.format.extent161 - 178-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectCelebrityen_US
dc.subjectEffortless achievementen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectHard worken_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen_US
dc.subjectSocial classen_US
dc.title‘We can get everything we want if we try hard’: young people, celebrity, hard worken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00071005.2014.1002382-
dc.relation.isPartOfBritish Journal of Educational Studies-
pubs.issue2-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.volume63-
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