Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15159
Title: Neural Correlates of Spatial Attention and Target Detection in a Multi-Target Environment
Authors: de Haan, B
Bither, M
Brauer, A
Karnath, H-O
Keywords: Science & Technology;Life Sciences & Biomedicine;Neurosciences;Neurosciences & Neurology;extinction;functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI);intraparietal sulcus (IPS);parietal;temporo-parietal junction (TPJ);SHORT-TERM-MEMORY;TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION;POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX;HUMAN CEREBRAL-CORTEX;VISUAL EXTINCTION;FUNCTIONAL MRI;CYTOARCHITECTONIC MAPS;SEPARATING PROCESSES;BRAIN;SELECTION
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC
Citation: CEREBRAL CORTEX, 2015, 25 (8), pp. 2321 - 2331 (11)
Abstract: Our ability to attend and respond in a multi-target environment is an essential and distinct human skill, as is dramatically demonstrated in stroke patients suffering from extinction. We performed an fMRI study to determine the neural anatomy associated with attending and responding to simultaneously presented targets. In healthy subjects, we tested the hypothesis that the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) is associated both with the top-down direction of attention to multiple target locations and the bottom-up detection of multiple targets, whereas the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) is predominantly associated with the bottom-up detection of multiple targets. We used a cued target detection task with a high proportion of catch trials to separately estimate top-down cue-related and bottom-up target-related neural activity. Both cues and targets could be presented unilaterally or bilaterally. We found no evidence of target-related neural activation specific to bilateral situations in the TPJ, but observed both cue-related and target-related neural activation specific to bilateral situations in the right IPS and target-related neural activity specific to bilateral situations in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). We conclude that the IPS and the IFG of the right hemisphere underlie our ability to attend and respond in a multi-target environment.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15159
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu046
ISSN: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000359320000027&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=f12c8c83318cf2733e615e54d9ed7ad5
http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000359320000027&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=f12c8c83318cf2733e615e54d9ed7ad5
1047-3211
1460-2199
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Fulltext.pdf227.43 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in BURA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.