Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16320
Title: FARNESYLTRANSFERASE INHIBITOR AND RAPAMYCIN CORRECT ABBERANT GENOME ORGANISATION AND DNA DAMAGE IN HUTCHINSON-GILFORD PROGERIA SYNDROME FIBROBLASTS.
Authors: Bridger, JM
Keywords: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome;genome organisation;chromosome territories;telomeres;COMET assay;FISH
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Citation: Biogerontology
Abstract: Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare and fatal premature ageing disease in children. HGPS is one of several progeroid syndromes caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear structural proteins lamins A and C. In classic HGPS the mutation G608G in exon 11 leads to the formation of a toxic lamin A protein called Progerin. During post-translational processing progerin remains farnesylated owing to the mutation interfering with a step whereby the farnesyl moiety is removed by the enzyme ZMPSTE24. Permanent farnesylation of progerin is thought to be responsible for the proteins toxicity. Farnesyl is generated through the melavonate pathway and three drugs that interfere with this pathway and hence the farnesylation of proteins have been administered to HGPS children in clinical trials. These are a farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), statin and a bisphosphonate. Further experimental studies have revealed that other drugs such as N-acetyl cysteine, rapamycin and IGF- 1 may be of use in treating HGPS through other pathways. We have shown previously that FTIs restore chromosome positioning in interphase HGPS nuclei. Mis-localisation of chromosomes could affect the cells ability to regulate proper genome function. Using 9 different drug treatments representing drug regimes in the clinic we have shown that combinatorial treatments containing FTIs are most effective in restoring specific chromosome positioning towards the nuclear periphery and in tethering telomeres to the nucleoskeleton.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16320
ISSN: 1389-5729
Appears in Collections:Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Fulltext.pdf1.94 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in BURA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.