Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16470
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dc.contributor.authorAbdoulhalik, A-
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, AA-
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-27T11:07:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-
dc.date.available2018-06-27T11:07:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifierC-
dc.identifierC-
dc.identifierC-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Hydrology, 2017, 553 pp. 708 - 721en_US
dc.identifier.issnC-
dc.identifier.issnC-
dc.identifier.issnC-
dc.identifier.issn0022-1694-
dc.identifier.issnhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.08.044-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/16470-
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of this work was to examine how aquifer layering impacts the ability of subsurface dams to retain seawater intrusion (SWI) and to clean up contaminated coastal aquifers using both exper- imental and numerical techniques. Four different layering configurations were investigated, including a homogeneous case (case H), and three different layered cases where a low permeability layer was set at the top of the aquifer (case LH), at the middle part of the aquifer as interlayer (case HLH), and at the lower part of the aquifer (case HL). The subsurface dam was able to retain the saltwater wedge associated with a drop of the hydraulic gradient from 0.0158 down to 0.0095 in all the cases, thereby achieving up to 78% reduction in the saltwater toe length. In cases LH and HLH, the start of the saltwater spillage was delayed compared to the homogeneous case, and the time taken for the freshwater zone to be fully contaminated (post-spillage) was twice and three times longer, respectively. By contrast, the existence of a low K layer at the bottom of the aquifer (case HL) considerably weakened the ability of dams to retain the intrusion, allowing for quicker saltwater spillage past the wall. The natural cleanup of SWI-contaminated coastal aquifers was, for the first time, evidenced in heterogeneous settings. Depending on the stratification pat- tern, the presence of stratified layers however prolonged the cleanup time to various degrees, compared to the homogeneous scenario, particularly in case HL, where the cleanup time was nearly 50% longeren_US
dc.format.extent708 - 721-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectSubsurface physical barriersen_US
dc.subjectCoastal aquifer managementen_US
dc.subjectLaboratory experimentsen_US
dc.subjectSEAWATen_US
dc.subjectAquifer remediationen_US
dc.subjectSubsurface heterogeneityen_US
dc.titleHow does layered heterogeneity affect the ability of subsurface dams to clean up coastal aquifers contaminated with seawater intrusion?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.08.044-
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Hydrology-
pubs.notespublisher: Elsevier articletitle: How does layered heterogeneity affect the ability of subsurface dams to clean up coastal aquifers contaminated with seawater intrusion? journaltitle: Journal of Hydrology articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.08.044 content_type: article copyright: © 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.volume553-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering Embargoed Research Papers

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