Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/23368
Title: The Epidemiology of Hospitalization for Pneumonia in Children under Five in the Rural Western Region of Nepal: A Descriptive Study
Authors: Banstola, A
Banstola, A
Issue Date: 7-Aug-2013
Publisher: PLOS
Citation: Banstola, A. and Banstola, A. (2013) 'The Epidemiology of Hospitalization for Pneumonia in Children under Five in the Rural Western Region of Nepal: A Descriptive Study', PLoS ONE 8 (8), e71311, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071311.
Abstract: © 2013 Banstola, Banstola. Pneumonia is one of the major public health problems in children under five years of age. The aim of this study was to analyze the time, place, and characteristics of the distribution of pneumonia in hospitalized children under five years of age at the Dhaulagiri Zonal Hospital (DZH) in Nepal. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at DZH from July 16, 2008 to August 17, 2011 for hospitalized children under five years of age and diagnosed with pneumonia. The main bacterial cause of pneumonia was Streptococcus pneumoniae and the main viral cause was Respiratory Syntical Virus (RSV). The majority of children admitted for treatment of pneumonia were males (60%), from upper class ethnic groups, and common among those aged 29 days to one year (49.1% of overall pneumonia cases). Data from this study show that pneumonia episodes in DZH occurred throughout the year with a sharp increase in the occurrence at the end of August to September. More cases were recorded during the rainy seasons and winter months in all three study years. The cases were from households most concentrated in Baglung municipality where the hospital is located. Pneumonia was found in higher proportions among hospitalized male children, those aged 29 days to one year, and in upper ethnic groups, during the rainy seasons and in winter months, and among local populations near the hospital in the rural western region of Nepal. Strengthening community-based case management, prevention strategies, and health care delivery system would help reduce pneumonia cases and the overall burden associated with it. © 2013 Banstola, Banstola.
URI: https://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/23368
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0071311
Other Identifiers: e71311
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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